Corruption Engraved in System, Asia Development Banking Funding

Rotten Apples
Photo: Rotten apples in a barrel.
N0193. CORRUPTION ENGRAVED IN THE SYSTEM. Corruption has been engraved into the government system for a very long time and is going to take time to get rid of,   says RFMF Land Force Commander Colonel Mosese Tikoitoga. He said that for the last three or four years, “We have tried our best and we continue to do the most that we can ... It will take a bit of time to get everybody into it but there’s a major shift since we started until today.”

This is one of the reasons why “We are continuously replacing people, shifting people around, trying to find a way out of this mind set,”

“You see [in the PM's] speeches and in all his visitations and in any opportunity that he gets to speak in public, he continues to stress the importance of working effectively and produce what the government wants them to produce [in this regard.]”

Sara'ssista, a predictable, regular contributor, thinks Tikoitoga gives "an hilarious insight into the regime's anti-corruption strategy.  Perhaps they are not looking in the mirror or to the guy on their right and their left?? " I find the "insight" perfectly credible, and her inference of corruption  in government once again a sweeping generalisation in need of evidence.

N0194. ADB PROJECTS IN FIJI. The Asian Development Bank (ADB)  expects to strengthen relations with Fiji by identifying new development projects to fund.

Newly appointed ADB Regional Director South Pacific Sub-Regional Office, Adrian Ruthenberg, said, "Fiji meets most of the criteria established by ADB for development assistance and we welcome proposals for new development projects."

The ADB is currently funding three major upgrading projects which includes the Kings Road (FRUP 3), Suva - Nausori Water and Sewerage and the Flood Recovery and will soon embark on a Poverty Alleviation project.

Mr Ruthenberg said ADB was also responsible for the Cook Islands, Kiribati, Samoa, Tonga and Tuvalu but most of his schedule would focus on Fiji as the largest of these six island countries.

Comments

tanner man said…
People who have been found to be corrupt should be "moved around" they should be removed from their jobs period. The people in government that appear to me moved around the most are the many military personal - if they are corrupt then they should be removed (not moved to new roles) from the job AND the RFMF. However i can't remember the last person from the RFMF that was charged for corruption....they just seem to go on long leave or get rewarded with overseas postings.
remate said…
Ah yes our great PM always lecturing the masses on the good the military do and the corrupt government. Wake up people the military is the governemnt and have been for 4 years. With big questions remianing over the PMs personal leave payout and no transparncy on military accounts i would suggets he start practicing what he preaches.
sara'ssista said…
'one of the reasons why “We are continuously replacing people, shifting people around, trying to find a way out of this mind set' , a credible insight??
sara'ssista said…
Apparently the sort of presumption of innocence that is accorded this regime , is apparently not afforded the flawed but as yet unconvicted members of the previous elected government. Can I suggest that no corruption has been reported in this regime, as no-one has either dared to find or look for it, and even if they did, who would they report it to and would it be made public? the very idea that as there is no evidence, it must not exist... either applies to all or none. Don't forget this the regime that chides not to make any statements at all if they are not positive to their agenda.
Walker Texas Ranger said…
@ remate & Sara'ssista.....

Face the facts: what Colonel Tikoitoga says is so: corruption is indeed embedded, engraved in the entire institutional sytem in Fiji. It is also in private enterprise and within the professions. Those who have not learned this in their academic training overseas pick it up with alacrity once arrived back. In one year, one has found it operating at every level of every sector. No business investor would be able to operate without having to collude with or face it off on a daily basis. What kind of future does this predict? And women are as able at it as men. The former Assistant in the Agriculture Scam was as practised as her boss? What does this say, on International Womens' Day of the preparedness of women to take their place in the roll of purloiners of Public Money? Defrauding Fiji of its future and all who pay taxes of their rights? Corrupt women forfeit the future. They hold the future hostage for all Fiji's children. Mrs Rigamoto was found wanting as was her Minister Apisai Tora: too trusting to 'engraved impunity' to tell the truth consistently on oath? An inconsistency which has now caught up with both?
sara'ssista said…
@ Walker Texas Ranger.. iam not disagreeing with your point, what i am saying is that only some will put under scrutiny and NO-ONE even wants to find corrunption in the military or police... so what chance does it have. What happened to the last police commish and his brother church...?? No doubt Fiji is prone to corrunpt behaviour but to be lectured by a military regime that picks and choses which laws apply to them is a bit rich isn't it ?? Where is the moral authority?
graptxua said…
I think it is important for "outsiders" to realize that what Westerners call "corruption" is actually the "traditionnal way" of doing things in tribal societies (I think that Fiji is is a tribal society outside of urban areas at least) That's the "vakavanua" as the people say.
Get Going! said…
@ sara'ssista.....Where is the moral authority?

Easy! It lies with YOU. What are you doing about it? Are YOU asking the pertinent questions? Are YOU following through? That's it - so simple really. If you wish to criticise and take aim.....then do so yourself, here, on the ground where it counts. If you are female (and we doubt it?) on International Women's Day 100th Anniversary, Get Going!
Declare your Conflicts of Interest! said…
@ graptxua......

There is no mistake about confusing traditional customs and cultural traditions with criminal conduct. The Crimes Decree 44 of 2009 is quite plain and clear. Conflicts of Interest are maybe the most difficult for people to grasp. When in doubt, declare any possible conflict in any situation. This is the basis of ethics and morality in any culture and it is common sense. One may not ably serve Two Masters. Who pays you? Declare who pays you.
Anonymous said…
The most disappointing thing about Mrs Rigamoto is that she came from a well known Methodist family, strong supporters of the church and she wore a mantle of moral authority. And there are many others like her, leaders who appear to use the church as cover for corrupt activities e.g the previous Police Commissioner. Enforced separation of church and state through the People's Charter may solve this problem to some extent but the initiative to set the highest standards of moral authority should come from the church leaders themselves and in Fiji's case, especially leaders of the Methodist Church.
The Methodist Church and political correctness said…
@ Mrs Rigamoto and her respectable Methodist connections .....

The Methodist Church of Fiji has made more than plain where it stands on racism and the political correctness of racial supremacy for some in a so-called democracy where racists may be supported and paid by public money. Their stance, we might assume logically, on criminal conduct might follow this track. Now what would Dr John Fraenkel and his fellow travellers have to comment on this? Something original and plausible which might make us believe they have a valid argument based on the facts?
Moral Methodist Leadership said…
@ the highest standards of moral authority....the Methodist Church of Fiji? The Methodist Church of Rotuma?

What a joke! If we were to leave this to leaders of these bodies, we should wait until Kingdom come!
Anonymous said…
A critical mass of indigenous Fijians are Methodists and their leaders can hardly be ignored. They have to be engaged by whatever means possible.
Awareness for the Critical Masses said…
@ Anonymous and the critical mass....

Perhaps it is time to privatise the Methodist Church in Fiji and maybe Rotuma? Privatisation would ensure some sound immersion in Moral Philosophy, Ethics 1 and most importantly, Economics & Globalisation Studies. Then we might have a better grasp on leadership. At present, there appears to be no secular foundation at all. Why would any religious organisation be permitted to tithe people who may not even pay taxes as individuals? Then they allegedly misuse these tithes to build power bases. A recipe for disaster and for mass poverty. "God helps those who help themselves" - taken to insidious lengths? The 'Critical Mass' needs to be more self-critical and aware.

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